Awarded Oracle Ace

I’m very delighted to announce, I’ve become an Oracle Ace 🙂

I received notification from the Oracle Ace Program a few weeks back saying:
“I am pleased to inform you that you have been chosen to receive the Oracle ACE award.  You have been chosen based on your significant contribution and activity in the Oracle technical community.  Like your fellow Oracle ACEs, you have demonstrated a proficiency in Oracle technology as well as a willingness to share your knowledge and experiences with the community.”

The Oracle Ace Program is Oracle’s way of recognising those individuals that give back to the Oracle community.  There are 3 levels:

More information can  be found here.

I was waiting for this to become official before announcing, but seem as I received this in the post over the weekend, I guess it’s official 🙂 :

ZedDBA_Ace_Gifts

I would like to thank Tim Hall (ORACLE-BASE), for the conversation we had back in Oracle Open World 15 #OOW15, where we had deep discussion about blogging.  This was the start of my journey in the blogging space, which Tim has mentored me throughout and was first to nominate me to the Oracle Ace Program.  So many thanks Tim 🙂

I would also like to thank Kiran Tailor (Pure DBA), for also nominating me to the Oracle Ace Program.  As well as Zohar Elkayam (Real DBA Magic), Martin Widlake (Yet Another Oracle Blog) and Neil Chandler (DB Blog) for their tips and tricks.  As well as Jeff Smith (That Jeff Smith), Monty Latiolais (Monty Latiolais blogspot) and Pete Sharman (Pete who did not tweet) for promoting my blog.

And finally, most importantly Version 1 for supporting my blogging and presenting activities as well as UK Oracle User Group who have been kind enough to accept my presentations over the last few years and for the Oracle Ace Program for accepting me 🙂  And not to mention my wife and kids for letting me enjoy myself at conferences when I could be spending time with them 🙂

I’m very honoured, proud and grateful to be an Oracle Ace in addition to my Oracle Certified Master, which make 2 out of 3 of my career long ambitions of:

Which is not bad, so I guess now it time to upgrade my OCM to 12c, maintain my Oracle Ace (with possibility of becoming Ace Director) for many more years and hope to achieve latter 🙂

For those who are interested, you can see my Oracle Ace profile here.

Thanks for all your support!

You can follow me through my various Social Media avenues available on the sidebar and/or subscribe to this oracle blog via WordPress/e-mail.

Zed DBA (Zahid Anwar)

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Session using a database link hangs on “SQL*Net more data from dblink”

I have a client who recently move a database server from on-premise to a Cloud provider.  A database on this database server had a database link to their E-business database in the Oracle Cloud.  Since the move, any sessions in the database that use the database link to the E-business database would hang if the query was to return large dataset.

Below is selecting from dual over the database link that worked:

SQL> set timing on
SQL> set autotrace on
SQL> select * from dual@ebs;

D
-
X

Elapsed: 00:00:00.13

Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 272002086

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation              | Name | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     | Inst   |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT REMOTE|      |     1 |     2 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |        |
|   1 |  TABLE ACCESS FULL     | DUAL |     1 |     2 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 | PWGPSI |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Note
-----
   - fully remote statement


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
          0  recursive calls
          0  db block gets
          0  consistent gets
          0  physical reads
          0  redo size
        511  bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
        492  bytes received via SQL*Net from client
          2  SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
          0  sorts (memory)
          0  sorts (disk)
          1  rows processed

SQL>

But selecting from a table hangs:

SQL> select * from XXX_PER_PEOPLE_F@ebs;

Hangs!......

The session in the source database shows the wait “SQL*Net more data from dblink”:

       SID USERNAME       STATUS   MACHINE                         TERMINAL                       PROGRAM                                          EVENT                                        WAIT_CLASS                   WAIT_TIME SECONDS_IN_WAIT STATE

---------- -------------- -------- ------------------------------- ------------------------------ ------------------------------------------------ -------------------------------------------- ---------------------------- --------- --------------- -------------------

       144 XXXXXXXXX      ACTIVE   XXX                             unknown                        sqlplus@xxxxx.xxxxx.xxx (TNS V1-V3)              SQL*Net more data from dblink                Network                      0         341             WAITING

The session in the target database shows the wait “SQL*Net message from client”:

SID USERNAME EVENT                       SQL_ID   MACHINE       PROGRAM                        PROCESS 
--- -------- --------------------------- -------- ------------- ------------------------------ ---------- 
35  XXX      SQL*Net message from client XXX      XXX.XXX.XXX   oracle@XXX.XXX.XXX (TNS V1-V3) 15340

I traced the source session and could see the session hangs waiting for more data from the target (EBS) database:

WAIT #2: nam='SQL*Net message to client' ela= 2 driver id=1650815232 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920328443464

*** 2018-07-17 11:13:47.934

WAIT #2: nam='SQL*Net message from client' ela= 11336000 driver id=1650815232 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920339779586
WAIT #0: nam='single-task message' ela= 179653 p1=0 p2=0 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920339960679
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message to dblink' ela= 1 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920339989423
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message from dblink' ela= 29064 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340018526
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message to dblink' ela= 0 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340018982
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message from dblink' ela= 30534 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340049542
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message to dblink' ela= 1 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340049793
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message from dblink' ela= 42171 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340091996
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data from dblink' ela= 4 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=17 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340092053
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message to dblink' ela= 0 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340092253
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message from dblink' ela= 28448 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340120720
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message to dblink' ela= 0 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340120854
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message from dblink' ela= 30884 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340151761
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message to dblink' ela= 1 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340151816
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message from dblink' ela= 28590 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340180420
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message to client' ela= 2 driver id=1650815232 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340180491
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message from client' ela= 207 driver id=1650815232 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340180713
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message to dblink' ela= 0 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340180787
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message from dblink' ela= 28635 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340209434
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message to client' ela= 1 driver id=1650815232 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340209472
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message from client' ela= 70 driver id=1650815232 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340209554
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message to dblink' ela= 0 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340209601
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message from dblink' ela= 29357 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340238969
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data from dblink' ela= 6 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=4 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340239133
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data from dblink' ela= 37 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340239196
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data from dblink' ela= 124 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=2 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340239340
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data from dblink' ela= 37 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=4 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340239409
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data from dblink' ela= 93 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=3 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340239528
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data from dblink' ela= 79 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340239632
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data from dblink' ela= 28330 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=2 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340268062
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data from dblink' ela= 4 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=2 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340268111
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data from dblink' ela= 168 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340268297
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data from dblink' ela= 55 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340268378
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data from dblink' ela= 69 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=4 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340268483
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data from dblink' ela= 47 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=4 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=1495920340268553
Hangs!...

After raising a SR with My Oracle Support (MOS) for the database we manage and for the one Oracle manage in the Oracle Cloud, it was concluded the package size (Session Data Unit) was larger then the allowable for a network component between the two databases.  They referred to MOS note:

Query on “bigtable” from remote Client hangs (certain queries or fields) (Doc ID 2104257.1)

“SYMPTOMS

Certain queries are hanging when run from some remote Clients.  However, other (smaller) queries are successful.

This is especially evident on queries that require more than 2kb of data to be returned.
Some examples:

select * from v$database; –> hangs
select count(*) from v$database; –> works

DESCRIBE with large data results –> hangs
DESCRIBE with small data results –> works

This might also show up with Database Links (DBLINK) as well.

CAUSE

A Network “security” device or setting (possibly local especially on a Microsoft Windows machine) is preventing or “altering” larger TCP packets from being transported across the network.
This in turn is causing the Client to wait on the Server for the data from the query, and the Server to wait on the Client (which thinks part of the packet is still on the way).

1. Check for settings like the DF (“Don’t Fragment”) bit being set.
2. Check for ALG SQL settings being enabled.

*Note: these causes are all external to Oracle so provided only as potential causes.

SOLUTION

Workaround
~~~~~~~~~
As a workaround (or test to prove this is or is not the issue) lower the SQL*Net SDU from the default size of 8192 to 1400 (see reference below for more details on this setting):

1. Add the following single line to the sqlnet.ora file on BOTH ends of the communication:
DEFAULT_SDU_SIZE = 1400

2. Restart the Listener(s) servicing the Database in question, make a new connection from the Client, and test the query that was hanging.

3. If this corrects the issue and allows queries to complete, then there is a network / system device or setting causing fragmentation, detention, or alteration of SQL packets mid-stream.”

Oracle Support set the SDU in the sqlnet.ora file on the target database server:
DEFAULT_SDU_SIZE = 1400

More info on DEFAULT_SDU_SIZE can be found here:

Database Net Services Reference -> 5 Parameters for the sqlnet.ora File -> DEFAULT_SDU_SIZE

And then restarted the listener.  I did the same for the source database server and then the session no longer hanged 🙂 :

SQL> select * from XXX_PER_PEOPLE_F@ebs;
...

1069 rows selected.

Elapsed: 00:00:02.57

Update

28/08/2018 The issue wasn’t resolved and the MTU of the network cards on both the source and target servers was also changed to 1400.  It could possibly been resolved by reducing the SDU further but it was decided to change the MTU on network cards.  In most cases the SDU change will fix the issue, but otherwise the MTU on network card can also resolve the issue as in this case.

If you found this blog post useful, please like as well as follow me through my various Social Media avenues available on the sidebar and/or subscribe to this oracle blog via WordPress/e-mail.

Thanks

Zed DBA (Zahid Anwar)

Index Monitoring in Oracle Database

Applies to ONLY Oracle Database 10gR1 through to 12cR1.
In Oracle Database 12cR2, this feature is replaced.  A new blog post of this feature will be posted in due course.

Since Oracle 10g, you can monitor indexes to see if they are being used or not.  Which is very useful as indexes, consume unnecessary CPU and I/O on DML activity if not used.  Therefore, it’s recommended to monitor indexes and any unused indexes can be dropped, not only freeing vital space but CPU and I/O, resulting in better throughput.

It recommended to enable index monitoring for an appropriate period that is representative of your full workload cycle.  For example if you run a report every week, month or even year, just to catch all those activities.

Please Note: It’s important that foreign key constraints have associated indexes to avoid any table level lock on DML.  These indirect uses of indexes will not be detected by index monitoring.  So be mindful when dropping indexes that are associated with foreign key constraint.

Enable Index Monitoring

To Enable Index Monitoring, you alter the index as shown below:

ALTER INDEX . MONITORING USAGE;

Checking Index Usage

To check if the index has been used, will depends on the version of Oracle:

Oracle 10g/11g

SELECT * FROM V$OBJECT_USAGE;

Database Reference 10g – V$OBJECT_USAGE
Database Reference 11g – V$OBJECT_USAGE

Please Note: Only shows the indexes belonging to the login user.

To see all indexes in the database regardless of the logged on user:

select 
do.owner,
t.name table_name, io.name index_name,
decode(bitand(i.flags, 65536), 0, 'NO', 'YES') monitoring,
decode(bitand(ou.flags, 1), 0, 'NO', 'YES') used,
ou.start_monitoring,
ou.end_monitoring 
from 
sys.obj$ io, 
sys.obj$ t, 
sys.ind$ i, 
sys.object_usage ou,
dba_objects do 
where i.obj# = ou.obj# 
and io.obj# = ou.obj# 
and t.obj# = i.bo#
and i.obj# = do.object_id
order by 1, 2, 3;

DISCLAIMER: As accessing data dictionary objects directly, this query is not guaranteed to work.

Oracle 12cR1

“The V$OBJECT_USAGE view is deprecated in Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1) and maintained for backward compatibility. Support for this view may be removed in a future release. Oracle recommends that you use the USER_OBJECT_USAGE view instead of the V$OBJECT_USAGE view.”

Database Reference 12cR1 – V$OBJECT_USAGE

For the current logon user:

SELECT * FROM USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

Database Reference 12cR1 – USER_OBJECT_USAGE

For all users:

SELECT * FROM DBA_OBJECT_USAGE;

Database Reference 12cR1 – DBA_OBJECT_USAGE

Dis-enable Index Monitoring

To Dis-enable Index Monitoring, you alter the index as shown below:

ALTER INDEX . NOMONITORING USAGE;

Demo of Index Monitoring

The content of the index_monitoring_demo.sql is below:

-------------------------------------------------------------
--
-- Index Monitoring Demo
--
-- File Name: index_monitoring_demo.sql (blog.zeddba.com)
-- Created: Zahid Anwar (ZedDBA)
-- 
-- Date: 16/07/2018
-- Version: 1.0
--
-- History
--
--1.0 16/07/2018 ZA Initial Script
--
-------------------------------------------------------------
set echo on
set pages 999 lines 400

CREATE TABLE "EMP"
( "ID" NUMBER,
"FIRST_NAME" VARCHAR2(50),
"LAST_NAME" VARCHAR2(50)
);

pause Press Enter

INSERT INTO "EMP" VALUES (1, 'Zahid', 'Anwar');
INSERT INTO "EMP" VALUES (2, 'Scott', 'Tiger');
INSERT INTO "EMP" VALUES (3, 'Joe', 'Bloggs');

commit;

pause Press Enter

set autotrace on
col id format 99
col first_name format a50
col last_Name format a50

select * from emp;

pause Press Enter

create index emp_id on emp (id);

pause Press Enter

select * from emp where id = 1;

pause Press Enter

set autotrace off

col INDEX_NAME format a20
col TABLE_NAME format a20
col MONITORING format a15
col USED format a10
select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

pause Press Enter

alter index emp_id monitoring usage;

pause Press Enter

select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

pause Press Enter

set autotrace on

select * from emp;

pause Press Enter

set autotrace off

select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

pause Press Enter

set autotrace on

select * from emp where id = 1;

pause Press Enter

set autotrace off

select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

pause Press Enter

alter index emp_id nomonitoring usage;

pause Press Enter

select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

pause Press Enter

DROP TABLE "EMP" PURGE;

Below is the output of the script index_monitoring_demo.sql:

SQL> @index_monitoring_demo.sql
SQL> set pages 999 lines 400
SQL>
SQL> CREATE TABLE "EMP"
2 ( "ID" NUMBER,
3 "FIRST_NAME" VARCHAR2(50),
4 "LAST_NAME" VARCHAR2(50)
5 );

Table created.

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Table EMP is created in my schema ZEDDBA, please ensure you have appropriate schema with correct privileges.  Next we insert 3 rows into the table EMP:

SQL> INSERT INTO "EMP" VALUES (1, 'Zahid', 'Anwar');

1 row created.

SQL> INSERT INTO "EMP" VALUES (2, 'Scott', 'Tiger');

1 row created.

SQL> INSERT INTO "EMP" VALUES (3, 'Joe', 'Bloggs');

1 row created.

SQL>
SQL> commit;

Commit complete.

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

With the 3 rows inserted and committed, we select from the EMP table with auto trace on, so we can see the execution plan:

SQL> set autotrace on
SQL> col id format 99
SQL> col first_name format a50
SQL> col last_Name format a50
SQL>
SQL> select * from emp;

ID FIRST_NAME LAST_NAME
--- -------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------
1 Zahid Anwar
2 Scott Tiger
3 Joe Bloggs


Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 3956160932

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | 3 | 201 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
| 1 | TABLE ACCESS STORAGE FULL| EMP | 3 | 201 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Note
-----
- dynamic statistics used: dynamic sampling (level=2)


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
12 recursive calls
0 db block gets
28 consistent gets
0 physical reads
0 redo size
784 bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
552 bytes received via SQL*Net from client
2 SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
0 sorts (memory)
0 sorts (disk)
3 rows processed

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Please Note: This database is an Exadata Machine, hence the “TABLE ACCESS STORAGE FULL“, otherwise would be “TABLE ACCESS FULL“.

As we can see the Execution Plan was a Full Table Scan (FTS) as this was the only access method available.  Next, we create an index on the emp_id:

SQL> create index emp_id on emp (id);

Index created.

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Next, we query the table with a predicate on emp_id:

SQL> select * from emp where id = 1;

ID FIRST_NAME LAST_NAME
--- -------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------
1 Zahid Anwar


Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 458854468

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | 1 | 67 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
| 1 | TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID BATCHED| EMP | 1 | 67 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
|* 2 | INDEX RANGE SCAN | EMP_ID | 1 | | 1 (0)| 00:00:01 |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

2 - access("ID"=1)

Note
-----
- dynamic statistics used: dynamic sampling (level=2)


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
11 recursive calls
0 db block gets
19 consistent gets
0 physical reads
0 redo size
695 bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
552 bytes received via SQL*Net from client
2 SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
0 sorts (memory)
0 sorts (disk)
1 rows processed

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Now, we can see the Execution Plan used the newly created index.  Next, we check if the index was used:

SQL> set autotrace off
SQL>
SQL> col INDEX_NAME format a20
SQL> col TABLE_NAME format a20
SQL> col MONITORING format a15
SQL> col USED format a10
SQL> select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

no rows selected

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

We get no rows back as we didn’t turn on index monitoring, which isn’t on by default.  So next, we enable index monitoring:

SQL> alter index emp_id monitoring usage;

Index altered.

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Next, we check the index usage and we can see it monitoring but not used:

SQL> select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

INDEX_NAME TABLE_NAME MONITORING USED START_MONITORING END_MONITORING
-------------------- -------------------- --------------- ---------- ------------------- -------------------
EMP_ID     EMP        YES        NO   07/16/2018 17:53:59

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Next, we query the table with no predicate to do a FTS:

SQL> set autotrace on
SQL>
SQL> select * from emp;

ID FIRST_NAME LAST_NAME
--- -------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------
1 Zahid Anwar
2 Scott Tiger
3 Joe Bloggs


Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 3956160932

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | 3 | 201 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
| 1 | TABLE ACCESS STORAGE FULL| EMP | 3 | 201 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Note
-----
- dynamic statistics used: dynamic sampling (level=2)


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
51 recursive calls
0 db block gets
54 consistent gets
0 physical reads
132 redo size
784 bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
552 bytes received via SQL*Net from client
2 SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
6 sorts (memory)
0 sorts (disk)
3 rows processed

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Next, we check if the index monitoring reflects the usage:

SQL> set autotrace off
SQL>
SQL> select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

INDEX_NAME TABLE_NAME MONITORING USED START_MONITORING END_MONITORING
-------------------- -------------------- --------------- ---------- ------------------- -------------------
EMP_ID     EMP        YES        NO   07/16/2018 17:53:59

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Next, we query the table with a predicate to do Index Range Scan:

SQL> set autotrace on
SQL>
SQL> select * from emp where id = 1;

ID FIRST_NAME LAST_NAME
--- -------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------
1 Zahid Anwar


Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 458854468

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | 1 | 67 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
| 1 | TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID BATCHED| EMP | 1 | 67 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
|* 2 | INDEX RANGE SCAN | EMP_ID | 1 | | 1 (0)| 00:00:01 |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

2 - access("ID"=1)

Note
-----
- dynamic statistics used: dynamic sampling (level=2)


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
13 recursive calls
3 db block gets
24 consistent gets
0 physical reads
876 redo size
695 bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
552 bytes received via SQL*Net from client
2 SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
0 sorts (memory)
0 sorts (disk)
1 rows processed

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Next, we check if the index monitoring reflects the usage:

SQL> set autotrace off
SQL>
SQL> select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

INDEX_NAME TABLE_NAME MONITORING USED START_MONITORING END_MONITORING
-------------------- -------------------- --------------- ---------- ------------------- -------------------
EMP_ID     EMP        YES        YES  07/16/2018 17:53:59

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Next, we now turn off index monitoring, as we know it’s been used:

SQL> alter index emp_id nomonitoring usage;

Index altered.

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Next, we check to see if monitoring is now disabled:

SQL> select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

INDEX_NAME TABLE_NAME MONITORING USED START_MONITORING END_MONITORING
-------------------- -------------------- --------------- ---------- ------------------- -------------------
EMP_ID     EMP        NO         YES  07/16/2018 17:53:59 07/16/2018 17:54:09

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Finally, we drop the demo EMP table:

SQL> DROP TABLE "EMP" PURGE;

Table dropped.

SQL>

If you found this blog post useful, please like as well as follow me through my various Social Media avenues available on the sidebar and/or subscribe to this oracle blog via WordPress/e-mail.

Thanks

Zed DBA (Zahid Anwar)