Index Monitoring in Oracle Database

Applies to ONLY Oracle Database 10gR1 through to 12cR1.
In Oracle Database 12cR2, this feature is replaced.  A new blog post of this feature will be posted in due course.

Since Oracle 10g, you can monitor indexes to see if they are being used or not.  Which is very useful as indexes, consume unnecessary CPU and I/O on DML activity if not used.  Therefore, it’s recommended to monitor indexes and any unused indexes can be dropped, not only freeing vital space but CPU and I/O, resulting in better throughput.

It recommended to enable index monitoring for an appropriate period that is representative of your full workload cycle.  For example if you run a report every week, month or even year, just to catch all those activities.

Please Note: It’s important that foreign key constraints have associated indexes to avoid any table level lock on DML.  These indirect uses of indexes will not be detected by index monitoring.  So be mindful when dropping indexes that are associated with foreign key constraint.

Enable Index Monitoring

To Enable Index Monitoring, you alter the index as shown below:

ALTER INDEX . MONITORING USAGE;

Checking Index Usage

To check if the index has been used, will depends on the version of Oracle:

Oracle 10g/11g

SELECT * FROM V$OBJECT_USAGE;

Database Reference 10g – V$OBJECT_USAGE
Database Reference 11g – V$OBJECT_USAGE

Please Note: Only shows the indexes belonging to the login user.

To see all indexes in the database regardless of the logged on user:

select 
do.owner,
t.name table_name, io.name index_name,
decode(bitand(i.flags, 65536), 0, 'NO', 'YES') monitoring,
decode(bitand(ou.flags, 1), 0, 'NO', 'YES') used,
ou.start_monitoring,
ou.end_monitoring 
from 
sys.obj$ io, 
sys.obj$ t, 
sys.ind$ i, 
sys.object_usage ou,
dba_objects do 
where i.obj# = ou.obj# 
and io.obj# = ou.obj# 
and t.obj# = i.bo#
and i.obj# = do.object_id
order by 1, 2, 3;

DISCLAIMER: As accessing data dictionary objects directly, this query is not guaranteed to work.

Oracle 12cR1

“The V$OBJECT_USAGE view is deprecated in Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1) and maintained for backward compatibility. Support for this view may be removed in a future release. Oracle recommends that you use the USER_OBJECT_USAGE view instead of the V$OBJECT_USAGE view.”

Database Reference 12cR1 – V$OBJECT_USAGE

For the current logon user:

SELECT * FROM USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

Database Reference 12cR1 – USER_OBJECT_USAGE

For all users:

SELECT * FROM DBA_OBJECT_USAGE;

Database Reference 12cR1 – DBA_OBJECT_USAGE

Dis-enable Index Monitoring

To Dis-enable Index Monitoring, you alter the index as shown below:

ALTER INDEX . NOMONITORING USAGE;

Demo of Index Monitoring

The content of the index_monitoring_demo.sql is below:

-------------------------------------------------------------
--
-- Index Monitoring Demo
--
-- File Name: index_monitoring_demo.sql (blog.zeddba.com)
-- Created: Zahid Anwar (ZedDBA)
-- 
-- Date: 16/07/2018
-- Version: 1.0
--
-- History
--
--1.0 16/07/2018 ZA Initial Script
--
-------------------------------------------------------------
set echo on
set pages 999 lines 400

CREATE TABLE "EMP"
( "ID" NUMBER,
"FIRST_NAME" VARCHAR2(50),
"LAST_NAME" VARCHAR2(50)
);

pause Press Enter

INSERT INTO "EMP" VALUES (1, 'Zahid', 'Anwar');
INSERT INTO "EMP" VALUES (2, 'Scott', 'Tiger');
INSERT INTO "EMP" VALUES (3, 'Joe', 'Bloggs');

commit;

pause Press Enter

set autotrace on
col id format 99
col first_name format a50
col last_Name format a50

select * from emp;

pause Press Enter

create index emp_id on emp (id);

pause Press Enter

select * from emp where id = 1;

pause Press Enter

set autotrace off

col INDEX_NAME format a20
col TABLE_NAME format a20
col MONITORING format a15
col USED format a10
select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

pause Press Enter

alter index emp_id monitoring usage;

pause Press Enter

select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

pause Press Enter

set autotrace on

select * from emp;

pause Press Enter

set autotrace off

select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

pause Press Enter

set autotrace on

select * from emp where id = 1;

pause Press Enter

set autotrace off

select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

pause Press Enter

alter index emp_id nomonitoring usage;

pause Press Enter

select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

pause Press Enter

DROP TABLE "EMP" PURGE;

Below is the output of the script index_monitoring_demo.sql:

SQL> @index_monitoring_demo.sql
SQL> set pages 999 lines 400
SQL>
SQL> CREATE TABLE "EMP"
2 ( "ID" NUMBER,
3 "FIRST_NAME" VARCHAR2(50),
4 "LAST_NAME" VARCHAR2(50)
5 );

Table created.

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Table EMP is created in my schema ZEDDBA, please ensure you have appropriate schema with correct privileges.  Next we insert 3 rows into the table EMP:

SQL> INSERT INTO "EMP" VALUES (1, 'Zahid', 'Anwar');

1 row created.

SQL> INSERT INTO "EMP" VALUES (2, 'Scott', 'Tiger');

1 row created.

SQL> INSERT INTO "EMP" VALUES (3, 'Joe', 'Bloggs');

1 row created.

SQL>
SQL> commit;

Commit complete.

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

With the 3 rows inserted and committed, we select from the EMP table with auto trace on, so we can see the execution plan:

SQL> set autotrace on
SQL> col id format 99
SQL> col first_name format a50
SQL> col last_Name format a50
SQL>
SQL> select * from emp;

ID FIRST_NAME LAST_NAME
--- -------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------
1 Zahid Anwar
2 Scott Tiger
3 Joe Bloggs


Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 3956160932

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | 3 | 201 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
| 1 | TABLE ACCESS STORAGE FULL| EMP | 3 | 201 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Note
-----
- dynamic statistics used: dynamic sampling (level=2)


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
12 recursive calls
0 db block gets
28 consistent gets
0 physical reads
0 redo size
784 bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
552 bytes received via SQL*Net from client
2 SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
0 sorts (memory)
0 sorts (disk)
3 rows processed

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Please Note: This database is an Exadata Machine, hence the “TABLE ACCESS STORAGE FULL“, otherwise would be “TABLE ACCESS FULL“.

As we can see the Execution Plan was a Full Table Scan (FTS) as this was the only access method available.  Next, we create an index on the emp_id:

SQL> create index emp_id on emp (id);

Index created.

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Next, we query the table with a predicate on emp_id:

SQL> select * from emp where id = 1;

ID FIRST_NAME LAST_NAME
--- -------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------
1 Zahid Anwar


Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 458854468

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | 1 | 67 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
| 1 | TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID BATCHED| EMP | 1 | 67 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
|* 2 | INDEX RANGE SCAN | EMP_ID | 1 | | 1 (0)| 00:00:01 |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

2 - access("ID"=1)

Note
-----
- dynamic statistics used: dynamic sampling (level=2)


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
11 recursive calls
0 db block gets
19 consistent gets
0 physical reads
0 redo size
695 bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
552 bytes received via SQL*Net from client
2 SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
0 sorts (memory)
0 sorts (disk)
1 rows processed

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Now, we can see the Execution Plan used the newly created index.  Next, we check if the index was used:

SQL> set autotrace off
SQL>
SQL> col INDEX_NAME format a20
SQL> col TABLE_NAME format a20
SQL> col MONITORING format a15
SQL> col USED format a10
SQL> select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

no rows selected

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

We get no rows back as we didn’t turn on index monitoring, which isn’t on by default.  So next, we enable index monitoring:

SQL> alter index emp_id monitoring usage;

Index altered.

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Next, we check the index usage and we can see it monitoring but not used:

SQL> select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

INDEX_NAME TABLE_NAME MONITORING USED START_MONITORING END_MONITORING
-------------------- -------------------- --------------- ---------- ------------------- -------------------
EMP_ID     EMP        YES        NO   07/16/2018 17:53:59

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Next, we query the table with no predicate to do a FTS:

SQL> set autotrace on
SQL>
SQL> select * from emp;

ID FIRST_NAME LAST_NAME
--- -------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------
1 Zahid Anwar
2 Scott Tiger
3 Joe Bloggs


Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 3956160932

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | 3 | 201 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
| 1 | TABLE ACCESS STORAGE FULL| EMP | 3 | 201 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Note
-----
- dynamic statistics used: dynamic sampling (level=2)


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
51 recursive calls
0 db block gets
54 consistent gets
0 physical reads
132 redo size
784 bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
552 bytes received via SQL*Net from client
2 SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
6 sorts (memory)
0 sorts (disk)
3 rows processed

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Next, we check if the index monitoring reflects the usage:

SQL> set autotrace off
SQL>
SQL> select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

INDEX_NAME TABLE_NAME MONITORING USED START_MONITORING END_MONITORING
-------------------- -------------------- --------------- ---------- ------------------- -------------------
EMP_ID     EMP        YES        NO   07/16/2018 17:53:59

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Next, we query the table with a predicate to do Index Range Scan:

SQL> set autotrace on
SQL>
SQL> select * from emp where id = 1;

ID FIRST_NAME LAST_NAME
--- -------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------
1 Zahid Anwar


Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 458854468

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | 1 | 67 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
| 1 | TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID BATCHED| EMP | 1 | 67 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
|* 2 | INDEX RANGE SCAN | EMP_ID | 1 | | 1 (0)| 00:00:01 |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

2 - access("ID"=1)

Note
-----
- dynamic statistics used: dynamic sampling (level=2)


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
13 recursive calls
3 db block gets
24 consistent gets
0 physical reads
876 redo size
695 bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
552 bytes received via SQL*Net from client
2 SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
0 sorts (memory)
0 sorts (disk)
1 rows processed

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Next, we check if the index monitoring reflects the usage:

SQL> set autotrace off
SQL>
SQL> select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

INDEX_NAME TABLE_NAME MONITORING USED START_MONITORING END_MONITORING
-------------------- -------------------- --------------- ---------- ------------------- -------------------
EMP_ID     EMP        YES        YES  07/16/2018 17:53:59

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Next, we now turn off index monitoring, as we know it’s been used:

SQL> alter index emp_id nomonitoring usage;

Index altered.

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Next, we check to see if monitoring is now disabled:

SQL> select * from USER_OBJECT_USAGE;

INDEX_NAME TABLE_NAME MONITORING USED START_MONITORING END_MONITORING
-------------------- -------------------- --------------- ---------- ------------------- -------------------
EMP_ID     EMP        NO         YES  07/16/2018 17:53:59 07/16/2018 17:54:09

SQL>
SQL> pause Press Enter
Press Enter

Finally, we drop the demo EMP table:

SQL> DROP TABLE "EMP" PURGE;

Table dropped.

SQL>

If you found this blog post useful, please like as well as follow me through my various Social Media avenues available on the sidebar and/or subscribe to this oracle blog via WordPress/e-mail.

Thanks

Zed DBA (Zahid Anwar)

Advertisements

Adding a Datafile to Temp Tablespace

When monitoring Tablespace Usage (see my Tablespace Usage blog post for more info), there comes a point when you need to add a datafile to the temp tablespace to allow for growth and more importantly get below a monitoring threshold for example in OEM or OpsView.

Query to see Current Temp Datafiles State

To see the current state of the temp datafiles:

set pages 999
set lines 400
col FILE_NAME format a75
select d.TABLESPACE_NAME, d.FILE_NAME, d.BYTES/1024/1024 SIZE_MB, d.AUTOEXTENSIBLE, d.MAXBYTES/1024/1024 MAXSIZE_MB, d.INCREMENT_BY*(v.BLOCK_SIZE/1024)/1024 INCREMENT_BY_MB
from dba_temp_files d,
 v$tempfile v
where d.FILE_ID = v.FILE#
order by d.TABLESPACE_NAME, d.FILE_NAME;

Please Note: For pluggable databases, please ensure you are in the right PDB as temp datafiles can be at container level and/or pluggable database level.

Output from Current Temp Datafiles State

This is the output you will get from the query:

TABLESPACE_NAME FILE_NAME SIZE_MB AUT MAXSIZE_MB INCREMENT_BY_MB
------------------------------ --------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------- --- ---------- ---------------
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.451.891367325 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.452.891367321 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.454.891367305 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.455.891367301 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.457.891367299 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.458.891367295 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.459.891367159 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.461.891367165 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.463.891367201 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.465.891367203 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.466.891367207 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.468.891367223 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.469.891367227 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.471.891367243 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.472.891367251 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.473.891367255 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.475.891367261 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.477.891367289 32767 YES 32767 1024
...

38 rows selected.

SQL>

The … represents the several lines removed to make the output readable 🙂

Add Temp Datafile to Temp Tablespace

To add a temp datafile to ‘TEMP‘ to be initially 10G, auto extendable by 1G to maxsize of 32Gb:

ALTER TABLESPACE TEMP ADD TEMPFILE '+DATAC1' SIZE 10G AUTOEXTEND ON NEXT 1G MAXSIZE 32767M;

See Oracle Documentation for more info and Syntax:
https://docs.oracle.com/database/121/SQLRF/statements_3002.htm

Once added you’ll see the temp datafile in the above query:

TABLESPACE_NAME FILE_NAME SIZE_MB AUT MAXSIZE_MB INCREMENT_BY_MB
------------------------------ --------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------- --- ---------- ---------------
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.451.891367325 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.452.891367321 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.454.891367305 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.455.891367301 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.457.891367299 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.458.891367295 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.459.891367159 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.461.891367165 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.463.891367201 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.465.891367203 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.466.891367207 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.468.891367223 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.469.891367227 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.471.891367243 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.472.891367251 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.473.891367255 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.475.891367261 32767 YES 32767 1024
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.477.891367289 32767 YES 32767 1024
...
TEMP +DATAC1/VERS/TEMPFILE/temp.843.973079825 10240 YES 32767 1024

39 rows selected.

SQL>

Related Blog Posts:
Querying Tablespace Usage
Adding a Datafile to Tablespace

Updates
27th April 2018: Change the query to use v$tempfile instead of v$datafile as doesn’t work for PDBs.

If you found this blog post useful, please like as well as follow me through my various Social Media avenues available on the sidebar and/or subscribe to this oracle blog via WordPress/e-mail.

Thanks

Zed DBA (Zahid Anwar)

How to fix queries on DBA_FREE_SPACE that are slow

I found myself in a situation where OpsView, a monitoring tool, was having difficulty monitoring the tablespaces for a particular pluggable database.

Upon investigation it was found the queries against the dictionary table DBA_FREE_SPACE were taking a very long time:

SQL> set timing on
SQL> select nvl(sum(dfs.bytes)/1024/1024,0) from dba_free_space dfs where dfs.tablespace_name = 'USERS';

NVL(SUM(DFS.BYTES)/1024/1024,0)
-------------------------------
 70.75

Elapsed: 00:00:10.98

There are 60 tablespaces in this pluggable database, which the time varied querying each tablespace, but was by far where most the time was spent.

I wrote a PL/SQL block to mimic Opsview as I didn’t want to create an object (procedure) in this customer’s database:

SET SERVEROUTPUT ON
SET TIMING ON
DECLARE
 cursor ts_names is select tablespace_name from dba_tablespaces where contents != 'TEMPORARY';
 sql_used VARCHAR(200) := 'select nvl(sum(dfs.bytes)/1024/1024,0) from dba_free_space dfs where dfs.tablespace_name = ''text_string''';
 sql_free VARCHAR(200) := 'select nvl(sum(dfs.bytes)/1024/1024,0) from dba_free_space dfs where dfs.tablespace_name = ''text_string''';
 sql_max VARCHAR(200) := 'select sum(maxbytes-bytes)/1024/1024 from dba_data_files where AUTOEXTENSIBLE = ''YES'' and maxbytes>bytes and tablespace_name = ''text_string''';
 num_out NUMBER;
BEGIN
 FOR ts_name in ts_names
 LOOP
 --sql for used space
 EXECUTE IMMEDIATE replace(sql_used, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name) into num_out;
 dbms_output.put_line(replace(sql_used, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name));
 dbms_output.put_line(num_out);
 --sql for free space
 EXECUTE IMMEDIATE replace(sql_free, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name) into num_out;
 dbms_output.put_line(replace(sql_free, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name));
 dbms_output.put_line(num_out);
 --sql for max
 EXECUTE IMMEDIATE replace(sql_max, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name) into num_out;
 dbms_output.put_line(replace(sql_max, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name));
 dbms_output.put_line(num_out);
 END LOOP;
END;
/

I ran this and the total time was shocking 😐 :

SQL> --SET SERVEROUTPUT ON
SQL> SET TIMING ON
SQL> DECLARE
 2 cursor ts_names is select tablespace_name from dba_tablespaces where contents != 'TEMPORARY';
 3 sql_used VARCHAR(200) := 'select nvl(sum(dfs.bytes)/1024/1024,0) from dba_free_space dfs where dfs.tablespace_name = ''text_string''';
 4 sql_free VARCHAR(200) := 'select nvl(sum(dfs.bytes)/1024/1024,0) from dba_free_space dfs where dfs.tablespace_name = ''text_string''';
 5 sql_max VARCHAR(200) := 'select sum(maxbytes-bytes)/1024/1024 from dba_data_files where AUTOEXTENSIBLE = ''YES'' and maxbytes>bytes and tablespace_name = ''text_string''';
 6 num_out NUMBER;
 7 BEGIN
 8 FOR ts_name in ts_names
 9 LOOP
 10 --sql for used space
 11 EXECUTE IMMEDIATE replace(sql_used, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name) into num_out;
 12 dbms_output.put_line(replace(sql_used, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name));
 13 dbms_output.put_line(num_out);
 14 --sql for free space
 15 EXECUTE IMMEDIATE replace(sql_free, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name) into num_out;
 16 dbms_output.put_line(replace(sql_free, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name));
 17 dbms_output.put_line(num_out);
 --sql for max
 18 19 EXECUTE IMMEDIATE replace(sql_max, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name) into num_out;
 20 dbms_output.put_line(replace(sql_max, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name));
 21 dbms_output.put_line(num_out);
 22 END LOOP;
END;
 23 24 /

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:21:30.94
SQL>

So I searched My Oracle Support (MOS) and found the following MOS note:
Queries on DBA_FREE_SPACE are Slow (Doc ID 271169.1)

Which states:
“1) In release 10g, the view dba_free_space was modified to also include objects in the recycle bin.

2) Large number of objects in the recyclebin can slow down queries on  dba_free_space.

3) This is a normal behaviour.

4) For release 11g, the view dba_free_space doesn’t contain a hint which in case when there is only few objects in recyclebin, you may want to gather underlying stats of tables/dictionary to get better performance.”

The database indeed did have a lot of objects in the recycle bin (in the pluggable database):

SQL> SELECT count(*) from dba_recyclebin;

 COUNT(*)
----------
 27615

SQL>

With most of them drop recently:

SQL> select trunc(to_date(DROPTIME,'YYYY-MM-DD:HH24:MI:SS')), count(*) from dba_recyclebin group by trunc(to_date(DROPTIME,'YYYY-MM-DD:HH24:MI:SS'))
  2  order by 1
  3 /

TRUNC(TO_ COUNT(*)
--------- ----------
24-SEP-16 2
...
19-JAN-18 2506
20-JAN-18 4322
21-JAN-18 4321
22-JAN-18 4320
23-JAN-18 4321
24-JAN-18 4321
25-JAN-18 2446

421 rows selected.

SQL>

So I purged the recycle bin (with customers permission)  and re-ran the check:

SQL> purge dba_recyclebin;

DBA Recyclebin purged.

Elapsed: 00:06:30.39
SQL> --SET SERVEROUTPUT ON
SET TIMING ON
SQL> SQL> DECLARE
 2 cursor ts_names is select tablespace_name from dba_tablespaces where contents != 'TEMPORARY';
 3 sql_used VARCHAR(200) := 'select nvl(sum(dfs.bytes)/1024/1024,0) from dba_free_space dfs where dfs.tablespace_name = ''text_string''';
 4 sql_free VARCHAR(200) := 'select nvl(sum(dfs.bytes)/1024/1024,0) from dba_free_space dfs where dfs.tablespace_name = ''text_string''';
 5 sql_max VARCHAR(200) := 'select sum(maxbytes-bytes)/1024/1024 from dba_data_files where AUTOEXTENSIBLE = ''YES'' and maxbytes>bytes and tablespace_name = ''text_string''';
 6 num_out NUMBER;
 7 BEGIN
 8 FOR ts_name in ts_names
 9 LOOP
 10 --sql for used space
 11 EXECUTE IMMEDIATE replace(sql_used, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name) into num_out;
 12 dbms_output.put_line(replace(sql_used, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name));
 13 dbms_output.put_line(num_out);
 14 --sql for free space
 15 EXECUTE IMMEDIATE replace(sql_free, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name) into num_out;
 16 dbms_output.put_line(replace(sql_free, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name));
 17 dbms_output.put_line(num_out);
 18 --sql for max
 19 EXECUTE IMMEDIATE replace(sql_max, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name) into num_out;
 20 dbms_output.put_line(replace(sql_max, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name));
 21 dbms_output.put_line(num_out);
 22 END LOOP;
 23 END;
 24 /

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:02:46.25
SQL>

Result, the duration of the PL/SQL block went from 21 minutes to just under 3 minutes.  However I need it to go under 2 minutes as this was the timeout for OpsView.

So I proceed with the next recommendation in the MOS note of gather dictionary and fixed table stats (with customers permission) using MOS note:
How to Gather Statistics on Objects Owned by the ‘SYS’ User and ‘Fixed’ Objects (Doc ID 457926.1)

SQL> EXEC DBMS_STATS.GATHER_DICTIONARY_STATS;

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:00:20.49

SQL> EXEC DBMS_STATS.GATHER_FIXED_OBJECTS_STATS;

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:04:28.07

SQL> --SET SERVEROUTPUT ON
SET TIMING ON
SQL> SQL> DECLARE
 2 cursor ts_names is select tablespace_name from dba_tablespaces where contents != 'TEMPORARY';
 3 sql_used VARCHAR(200) := 'select nvl(sum(dfs.bytes)/1024/1024,0) from dba_free_space dfs where dfs.tablespace_name = ''text_string''';
 4 sql_free VARCHAR(200) := 'select nvl(sum(dfs.bytes)/1024/1024,0) from dba_free_space dfs where dfs.tablespace_name = ''text_string''';
 5 sql_max VARCHAR(200) := 'select sum(maxbytes-bytes)/1024/1024 from dba_data_files where AUTOEXTENSIBLE = ''YES'' and maxbytes>bytes and tablespace_name = ''text_string''';
 6 num_out NUMBER;
 7 BEGIN
 8 FOR ts_name in ts_names
 9 LOOP
 10 --sql for used space
 11 EXECUTE IMMEDIATE replace(sql_used, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name) into num_out;
 12 dbms_output.put_line(replace(sql_used, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name));
 13 dbms_output.put_line(num_out);
 14 --sql for free space
 15 EXECUTE IMMEDIATE replace(sql_free, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name) into num_out;
 16 dbms_output.put_line(replace(sql_free, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name));
 17 dbms_output.put_line(num_out);
 18 --sql for max
 19 EXECUTE IMMEDIATE replace(sql_max, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name) into num_out;
 20 dbms_output.put_line(replace(sql_max, 'text_string', ts_name.tablespace_name));
 21 dbms_output.put_line(num_out);
 22 END LOOP;
 23 END;
 24 /

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:00:04.53
SQL>

Bingo! the duration of the PL/SQL block went down to 4 seconds 🙂

PLEASE NOTE: This still effects non-pluggable databases, however in pluggable databases, you need to purge the recycle bin for where the dropped objects are, the container database and the pluggable databases require independent purge.

If you found this blog post useful, please like as well as follow me through my various Social Media avenues available on the sidebar and/or subscribe to this oracle blog via WordPress/e-mail.

Thanks

Zed DBA (Zahid Anwar)

New READ Object Privilege in 12cR1

In writing a blog post about:
Creating a Read Only Database User Account in an Oracle Database

It came to my attention of the new “READ” object privilege, which is a New Feature in 12.1.0.2:
Changes in Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1.0.2)
READ and SELECT Object Privileges

The “SELECT” object privilege in addition to querying the table, allows the user to:
LOCK TABLE table_name IN EXCLUSIVE MODE;
SELECTFROM table_name FOR UPDATE;

The New Feature of “READ” object privilege, does not allow the user to lock tables in exclusive mode nor select table for update.

Prior to 12.1.0.2, the “SELECT” object privilege is only available which allows the locking:

GRANT SELECT ON ... TO ...;

12.1.0.2 onwards, the new “READ” object privilege is available which doesn’t allow the locking:

GRANT READ ON ... TO ...;

This also applies to the “SELECT ON ANY TABLE“, prior to 12.1.0.2 which allows the locking:

GRANT SELECT ANY TABLE TO ...;

12.1.0.2 onwards, the new “READ ON ANY TABLE” object privilege is available which doesn’t allow the locking:

GRANT READ ANY TABLE TO ...;

If you found this blog post useful, please like as well as follow me through my various Social Media avenues available on the sidebar and/or subscribe to this oracle blog via WordPress/e-mail.

Thanks

Zed DBA (Zahid Anwar)

Creating a Read Only Database User Account in an Oracle Database

It can be quite common to create a “Read Only” database user account in an Oracle database.  To do this is pretty simple using the principle of least privilege:

CREATE USER READ_ONLY IDENTIFIED BY "password";
GRANT CREATE SESSION TO READ_ONLY;

Expected output:

SQL> CREATE USER READ_ONLY IDENTIFIED BY "password";

User created.

SQL> GRANT CREATE SESSION TO READ_ONLY;

Grant succeeded.

SQL>

Depending on the Oracle Version, it’s recommend to use “READ” object privilege new in 12.1.0.2 instead of “SELECT” to prevent locking.  See the following blog post for more info:
New READ Object Privilege in 12cR1

PLEASE NOTE: For anyone using Oracle Version prior to 12.1.0.2, replace the object privilege “READ” with “SELECT“.

To read specific tables for a schema:

SET HEADING OFF
SET PAGES 9999 LINES 400
SPOOL TABLE_GRANTS.sql
SELECT 'GRANT READ ON ' || OWNER || '.' || TABLE_NAME || ' TO READ_ONLY;'
FROM DBA_TABLES
WHERE OWNER IN ('ZEDDBA')
ORDER BY 1;
SPOOL OFF
@TABLE_GRANTS.sql
!rm TABLE_GRANTS.sql

Expected output, where you can see the user “READ_ONLY” able to select from the table owned by user “ZEDDBA“:

SQL> SET HEADING OFF
SQL> SET PAGES 9999 LINES 400
SQL> SPOOL TABLE_GRANTS.sql
SQL> SELECT 'GRANT READ ON ' || OWNER || '.' || TABLE_NAME || ' TO READ_ONLY;'
 2 FROM DBA_TABLES
 3 WHERE OWNER IN ('ZEDDBA')
 4 ORDER BY 1;

GRANT READ ON ZEDDBA.DEMO TO READ_ONLY;

SQL> SPOOL OFF
SQL> @TABLE_GRANTS.sql
SP2-0734: unknown command beginning "SQL> SELEC..." - rest of line ignored.

Grant succeeded.

SP2-0734: unknown command beginning "SQL> SPOOL..." - rest of line ignored.
SQL> !rm TABLE_GRANTS.sql

SQL> conn read_only/password
Connected.
SQL> SELECT * FROM ZEDDBA.DEMO;

Read Only example.

SQL> exit

To read all tables in the databases:

GRANT READ ANY TABLE TO READ_ONLY;

Expected output, where you can see the user “READ_ONLY” able to select from the table owned by user “ZEDDBA“, even after the revoke and the user “ZEDDBA2“, which hasn’t been explicitly referenced:

SQL> conn zeddba/zeddba
Connected.
SQL> REVOKE READ ON ZEDDBA.DEMO FROM READ_ONLY;

Revoke succeeded.

SQL> GRANT READ ANY TABLE TO READ_ONLY;

Grant succeeded.

SQL> conn read_only/password
Connected.
SQL> SELECT * FROM ZEDDBA.DEMO;

COMMENTS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Read Only example.

SQL> SELECT * FROM ZEDDBA2.DEMO;

COMMENTS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Read Only example.

SQL>

To grant access to dictionary tables:

GRANT SELECT ANY DICTIONARY TO READ_ONLY;

Expected output, where you can see the user “READ_ONLY” able to select from dictionary i.e. table starting with DBA and V$:

SQL> conn zeddba/zeddba
Connected.
SQL> GRANT SELECT ANY DICTIONARY TO READ_ONLY;

Grant succeeded.

SQL> conn read_only/password
Connected.
SQL> SELECT TABLE_NAME
 2 FROM DBA_TABLES
 3 WHERE OWNER = 'ZEDDBA';

TABLE_NAME
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DEMO

SQL> SELECT NAME FROM V$DATABASE;

NAME
---------
ZEDDBA

SQL>

If you found this blog post useful, please like as well as follow me through my various Social Media avenues available on the sidebar and/or subscribe to this oracle blog via WordPress/e-mail.

Thanks

Zed DBA (Zahid Anwar)

MRP process getting terminated with error ORA-10485

If you have a Data Guard environment, where you’ve just applied a Database Bundle Patch and OJVM Patch, it’s possible that your Physical Standby can throw the following error:

Completed: ALTER DATABASE RECOVER MANAGED STANDBY DATABASE DISCONNECT NODELAY
Wed Oct 11 08:11:57 2017
Media Recovery Log +RECOC1/VER1S/ARCHIVELOG/2017_10_11/thread_1_seq_18251.24912.957080425
MRP0: Background Media Recovery terminated with error 10485
Wed Oct 11 08:11:57 2017
Errors in file /u01/app/oracle/diag/rdbms/ver1s/VER1S2/trace/VER1S2_pr00_220336.trc:
ORA-10485: Real-Time Query cannot be enabled while applying migration redo.

This is because your database is “open” i.e. Active Data Guard (license option) and Managed Recovery Process is trying to apply the redo of datapatch which it can’t do when “open“.

See MOS note for more info:

MRP process getting terminated with error ORA-10485 (Doc ID 1618485.1):

“ORA-10485: Real-Time Query cannot be enabled while applying migration redo.

The Real-Time Query feature was enabled when an attempt was made to recover through migration redo generated during primary upgrades or downgrades”

The easiest solution is to restart the database as “mount” mode allowing the redo via Data Guard to apply the patch, then restart again as “open” mode:

DGMGRL> show configuration;

Configuration - ver1p

Protection Mode: MaxPerformance
 Members:
 ver1p - Primary database
 ver1s - Physical standby database
 Error: ORA-16766: Redo Apply is stopped

Fast-Start Failover: DISABLED

Configuration Status:
ERROR (status updated 37 seconds ago)

DGMGRL> show database ver1s;

Database - ver1s

Role: PHYSICAL STANDBY
 Intended State: APPLY-ON
 Transport Lag: 0 seconds (computed 0 seconds ago)
 Apply Lag: 2 hours 24 minutes 33 seconds (computed 1 second ago)
 Average Apply Rate: 99.32 MByte/s
 Real Time Query: OFF
 Instance(s):
 VER1S1
 VER1S2 (apply instance)

Database Error(s):
 ORA-16766: Redo Apply is stopped

Database Status:
ERROR

DGMGRL>

Now restart the database as “mount” mode allowing the redo via Data Guard to apply the patch:

[oracle@v1ex2dbadm01 ~]$ srvctl status database -d VER1S -v
Instance VER1S1 is running on node v1ex2dbadm01 with online services VER1_BK1,VER1_BK2,VER1_BK3,VER1_BK4. Instance status: Open,Readonly.
Instance VER1S2 is running on node v1ex2dbadm02. Instance status: Open,Readonly.
[oracle@v1ex2dbadm01 ~]$ srvctl config database -d VER1S
Database unique name: VER1S
Database name:
Oracle home: /u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1
Oracle user: oracle
Spfile: +DATAC1/VER1S/PARAMETERFILE/spfileVER1S.ora
Password file:
Domain:
Start options: open
Stop options: immediate
Database role: PHYSICAL_STANDBY
Management policy: AUTOMATIC
Server pools:
Disk Groups: DATAC1,RECOC1
Mount point paths:
Services: VER1_BK1,VER1_BK2,VER1_BK3,VER1_BK4
Type: RAC
Start concurrency:
Stop concurrency:
OSDBA group: dba
OSOPER group: dba
Database instances: VER1S1,VER1S2
Configured nodes: v1ex2dbadm01,v1ex2dbadm02
Database is administrator managed
[oracle@v1ex2dbadm01 ~]$ srvctl stop database -d VER1S
[oracle@v1ex2dbadm01 ~]$ srvctl start database -d VER1S -o mount

Re-check Data Guard Broker to check if the transport lag and status have cleared as expected:

DGMGRL> show database ver1s

Database - ver1s

Role: PHYSICAL STANDBY
 Intended State: APPLY-ON
 Transport Lag: 0 seconds (computed 0 seconds ago)
 Apply Lag: 0 seconds (computed 0 seconds ago)
 Average Apply Rate: 34.62 MByte/s
 Real Time Query: OFF
 Instance(s):
 VER1S1
 VER1S2 (apply instance)

Database Status:
SUCCESS

DGMGRL>

Then restart the database again as “open” mode (Active Data Guard):

[oracle@v1ex2dbadm01 ~]$ srvctl stop database -d VER1S
[oracle@v1ex2dbadm01 ~]$ srvctl start database -d VER1S
[oracle@v1ex2dbadm01 ~]$ srvctl status database -d VER1S -v
Instance VER1S1 is running on node v1ex2dbadm01 with online services VER1_BK1,VER1_BK2,VER1_BK3,VER1_BK4. Instance status: Open,Readonly.
Instance VER1S2 is running on node v1ex2dbadm02. Instance status: Open,Readonly.

Re-check Data Guard Broker to check if the “Real Time Query” is back on as expected:

DGMGRL> show configuration

Configuration - ver1p

Protection Mode: MaxPerformance
 Members:
 ver1p - Primary database
 ver1s - Physical standby database

Fast-Start Failover: DISABLED

Configuration Status:
SUCCESS (status updated 2 seconds ago)

DGMGRL> show database ver1s

Database - ver1s

Role: PHYSICAL STANDBY
 Intended State: APPLY-ON
 Transport Lag: 0 seconds (computed 0 seconds ago)
 Apply Lag: 0 seconds (computed 0 seconds ago)
 Average Apply Rate: 84.35 MByte/s
 Real Time Query: ON
 Instance(s):
 VER1S1
 VER1S2 (apply instance)

Database Status:
SUCCESS

DGMGRL>

 

If you found this blog post useful, please like as well as follow me through my various Social Media avenues available on the sidebar and/or subscribe to this oracle blog via WordPress/e-mail.

Thanks

Zed DBA (Zahid Anwar)

How To Enable DDL Logging in the Database

If for whatever reason, you are required to log DDL, for example, I need to know why the LAST_DDL_TIME of a table was getting updated, you can do this from Oracle 11g.

To enable:

SQL> show parameter ENABLE_DDL_LOGGING

NAME TYPE VALUE
------------------------------------ ----------- ------------------------------ 
enable_ddl_logging boolean FALSE

SQL> ALTER SYSTEM SET ENABLE_DDL_LOGGING=TRUE;

System altered.

SQL> show parameter ENABLE_DDL_LOGGING

NAME TYPE VALUE
------------------------------------ ----------- ------------------------------ 
enable_ddl_logging boolean TRUE

To disable:

SQL> show parameter ENABLE_DDL_LOGGING

NAME TYPE VALUE
------------------------------------ ----------- ------------------------------ 
enable_ddl_logging boolean TRUE

SQL> ALTER SYSTEM SET ENABLE_DDL_LOGGING=FASLE;

System altered. 

SQL> show parameter ENABLE_DDL_LOGGING 

NAME TYPE VALUE 
------------------------------------ ----------- ------------------------------ 
enable_ddl_logging boolean FALSE 

Create some DDL:

SQL> create view zeddba as select * from dual;

View created.

SQL> select * from zeddba;





SQL> drop view zeddba;

View dropped.

Oracle 12c

Now if you look in the following text file:
$ADR_BASE/diag/rdbms/${DBNAME}/${ORACLE_SID}/log/ddl_${ORACLE_SID}.log

You will see:

Mon Sep 11 15:52:59 2017
diag_adl:create view zahid as select * from dual
diag_adl:drop view zahid

There is also a XML version:
$ADR_BASE/diag/rdbms/${DBNAME}/${ORACLE_SID}/log/ddl/log.xml

<msg time='2017-09-11T15:41:35.000+01:00' org_id='oracle' comp_id='rdbms'
 msg_id='opiexe:4424:2946163730' type='UNKNOWN' group='diag_adl'
 level='16' host_id='v1ex1dbadm01.v1.com' host_addr='x.x.x.x'
 version='1'>
 <txt>create view zeddba as select * from dual
 </txt>
</msg>
<msg time='2017-09-11T15:41:45.942+01:00' org_id='oracle' comp_id='rdbms'
 msg_id='opiexe:4424:2946163730' type='UNKNOWN' group='diag_adl'
 level='16' host_id='v1ex1dbadm01.v1.com' host_addr='x.x.x.x'>
 <txt>drop view zeddba
 </txt>
</msg>

Oracle 11g

DDL statements are written to the alert log in: $ADR_BASE/diag/rdbms/${DBNAME}/${ORACLE_SID}/trace/alert_${ORACLE_SID}.log

License

Oracle Database Lifecycle Management Pack for Oracle Database

Licensed Parameters

The init.ora parameter ENABLE_DDL_LOGGING is licensed as part of the Database Lifecycle Management Pack when set to TRUE.  When set to TRUE, the database reports schema changes in real time into the database alert log under the message group schema_ddl. The default setting is FALSE.”

More info

Database Reference: ENABLE_DDL_LOGGING

See MOS Note:
How To Enable DDL Logging in Database (Doc ID 2207341.1)

“When ENABLE_DDL_LOGGING is set to true, the following DDL statements are written to the alert log:

ALTER/CREATE/DROP/TRUNCATE CLUSTER
ALTER/CREATE/DROP FUNCTION
ALTER/CREATE/DROP INDEX
ALTER/CREATE/DROP OUTLINE
ALTER/CREATE/DROP PACKAGE
ALTER/CREATE/DROP PACKAGE BODY
ALTER/CREATE/DROP PROCEDURE
ALTER/CREATE/DROP PROFILE
ALTER/CREATE/DROP SEQUENCE
CREATE/DROP SYNONYM
ALTER/CREATE/DROP/RENAME/TRUNCATE TABLE
ALTER/CREATE/DROP TRIGGER
ALTER/CREATE/DROP TYPE
ALTER/CREATE/DROP TYPE BODY
DROP USER
ALTER/CREATE/DROP VIEW

Earlier, RENAME was not logged and a bug was reported for that and the same is fixed in 11.2.0.4.
Document 12938609.8 – ENABLE_DDL_LOGGING does not log RENAME table statements, this is fixed in 11.2.0.4

However, the feature does not log DDLs of some DBMS_STATS operations like:
set_column_stats
set_index_stats
create_extended_stats
drop_extended_stats
set_*_prefs (table/schema/global etc)
delete_pending_stats
publish_pending_stats
export_pending_stats
create_stat_table 

There is an enhancement raised with development to add more operations to this mechanism and would get fixed in 12.2.

Unpublished Bug 22368778 : PERF_DIAG: ENABLE_DDL_LOGGING NEEDS TO LOG MORE DDLS”

If you found this blog post useful, please like as well as follow me through my various Social Media avenues available on the sidebar and/or subscribe to this oracle blog via WordPress/e-mail.

Thanks

Zed DBA (Zahid Anwar)