Assess Performance using Calibrate on Exadata

For those who are fortunate to have an Oracle Exadata Database Machine, may wonder if their Exadata meets the IOPS/MBPS as per the technical specifications.  Well with the command CALIBRATE in CellCLI, you can run raw performance tests on the cells’ hard disks and flash drives, enabling you to verify the disk/drive performance:

[root@v1ex1celadm01 ~]# cellcli
CellCLI: Release 12.1.2.3.4 - Production on Tue Jun 13 19:02:05 IST 2017

Copyright (c) 2007, 2016, Oracle. All rights reserved.

CellCLI> calibrate force;
Calibration will take a few minutes...
Aggregate random read throughput across all hard disk LUNs: 1823 MBPS
Aggregate random read throughput across all flash disk LUNs: 9973 MBPS
Aggregate random read IOs per second (IOPS) across all hard disk LUNs: 3002
Calibrating hard disks (read only) ...
LUN 0_0 on drive [8:0 ] random read throughput: 152.00 MBPS, and 243 IOPS
LUN 0_1 on drive [8:1 ] random read throughput: 157.00 MBPS, and 246 IOPS
LUN 0_10 on drive [8:10 ] random read throughput: 161.00 MBPS, and 253 IOPS
LUN 0_11 on drive [8:11 ] random read throughput: 157.00 MBPS, and 251 IOPS
LUN 0_2 on drive [8:2 ] random read throughput: 157.00 MBPS, and 244 IOPS
LUN 0_3 on drive [8:3 ] random read throughput: 158.00 MBPS, and 245 IOPS
LUN 0_4 on drive [8:4 ] random read throughput: 156.00 MBPS, and 248 IOPS
LUN 0_5 on drive [8:5 ] random read throughput: 161.00 MBPS, and 250 IOPS
LUN 0_6 on drive [8:6 ] random read throughput: 159.00 MBPS, and 252 IOPS
LUN 0_7 on drive [8:7 ] random read throughput: 158.00 MBPS, and 251 IOPS
LUN 0_8 on drive [8:8 ] random read throughput: 157.00 MBPS, and 251 IOPS
LUN 0_9 on drive [8:9 ] random read throughput: 159.00 MBPS, and 254 IOPS
Calibrating flash disks (read only, note that writes will be significantly slower) ...
LUN 1_1 on drive [FLASH_1_1] random read throughput: 2,157.00 MBPS, and 280525 IOPS
LUN 2_1 on drive [FLASH_2_1] random read throughput: 2,156.00 MBPS, and 274304 IOPS
LUN 4_1 on drive [FLASH_4_1] random read throughput: 2,158.00 MBPS, and 282083 IOPS
LUN 5_1 on drive [FLASH_5_1] random read throughput: 2,160.00 MBPS, and 287786 IOPS
CALIBRATE results are within an acceptable range.
Calibration has finished.

CellCLI>

 

The CALIBRATE FORCE, allows the test to run when CELLSRV is still up, this is acceptable if there is no user workload.  It is therefore recommended to not run during normal operations.  Without the FORCE, the CELLSRV must be shut down.

PLEASE NOTE: This is a single run on a single storage cell, you will need to run on all storage cells in the Exadata Machine to get the total IOPS/MBPS.  You can use dcli to run this across all the cells 🙂

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Thanks

Zed DBA (Zahid Anwar)

How to easily delete files in the Oracle Cloud using CloudBerry Explorer

So you have some Oracle Cloud storage, which was probably thrown in as a freebie initially by Oracle 🙂  Now your freebie is expiring and you decide you want to retain the service but now as metered, so you want to delete all the unnecessary files, which in my case are old Oracle database backups.

As you can see here I have 50k plus files using 897Gb:

Oracle Cloud Web Console Details

Here are the files listed in the Web Console:

Oracle Cloud Web Console List Objects

To delete them one by one isn’t feasible.

So the solution is to use a 3rd party file explorer, in my case CloudBerry Explorer from CloudBerry Labs:

https://www.cloudberrylab.com/explorer/openstack.aspx

The freeware version is perfectly fine, no need to purchase Pro or use the trial.  Just click ‘Cancel’ on the Register Product dialogue and then the application will load.

Once installed, to connect to your Oracle Cloud storage, you can follow this link:

https://www.cloudberrylab.com/blog/how-to-use-cloudberry-explorer-with-oracle-cloud-storage/

However, the key to connecting is to have the username in the format of:

<Your Oracle Cloud Service Instance Name>-<Your Oracle Cloud Identity Domain>:<Your Oracle Cloud User Name>

e.g. zeddbacloud-zeddba:oraclecloudbackup@zeddba.com

Also select the correct ‘Account location’ which will fill the ‘Authentication Service’:

CloudBerry Login

Keystone, set to ‘Do not use’.

When you finally manage to get connected, you’ll see something like this:

CloudBerry Explorer

Now you have the freedom, to browse your files and delete at leisure 🙂

If you found this blog post useful, please like as well as follow me through my various Social Media avenues available on the sidebar and/or subscribe to this oracle blog via WordPress/e-mail.

Thanks

Zed DBA (Zahid Anwar)